SARS-CoV-2 serology in MIS-C

Abstract

Objectives. We aimed to measure SARS-CoV-2 serologic responses in children hospitalized with multisystem inflammatory syndrome (MIS-C) compared to COVID-19, Kawasaki Disease (KD) and hospitalized pediatric controls.

Methods. From March 17, 2020 – May 26, 2020, we prospectively identified hospitalized children at Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta with MIS-C (n=10), symptomatic COVID-19 (n=10), KD (n=5), and hospitalized controls (n=4). With IRB approval, we obtained prospective and residual blood samples from these children and measured SARS-CoV-2 spike receptor binding domain (RBD) IgM and IgG, full-length spike IgG, and nucleocapsid protein antibodies by quantitative ELISAs and SARS-CoV-2 neutralizing antibodies by live-virus focus reduction neutralization assays. We statistically compared the log-transformed antibody titers among groups and performed linear regression analyses.

Results. All children with MIS-C had high titers of SARS-CoV-2 RBD IgG antibodies, which correlated with full-length spike IgG antibodies (R2 =0.956, P<0.001), nucleocapsid protein antibodies (R2 =0.846,P<0.001), and neutralizing antibodies (R2 =0.667, P<0.001). Children with MIS-C had significantly higher SARS-CoV-2 RBD IgG antibody titers (geometric mean titer [GMT] 6800, 95% CI 3495-13231) than children with COVID-19 (GMT 626, 95% CI 251-1563, P<0.001), KD (GMT 124, 95% CI 91-170, P<0.001) and hospitalized controls (GMT 85, P<0.001). All children with MIS-C also had detectable RBD IgM antibodies, indicating recent SARS-CoV-2 infection. RBD IgG titers correlated with erythrocyte sedimentation rate (R2 =0.512, P<0.046) and with hospital (R2 =0.548, P=0.014) and ICU lengths of stay (R2 =0.590, P=0.010).

Conclusion. Quantitative SARS-CoV-2 serology may have a role in establishing the diagnosis of MIS-C, distinguishing it from similar clinical entities, and stratifying risk for adverse outcomes.

SOURCE: Pediatrics

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Locale

The instantaneous reproduction number (R) is estimated using the daily incidence of new cases, while including effects of social distancing, population density, and combined temperature and humidity lagged over the prior 14 days.

This model projects the effect of a theoretical May 15 midway return of normal travel to non-essential businesses. Future cases are estimated from predicted values of R.

SOURCE: COVID-Lab

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Cardiac abnormalities in MIS-C

Abstract

BACKGROUND. During the SARS‐CoV2 pandemic, there has been increase in hyperinflammatory presentation in previously healthy children with a variety of cardiac manifestations. Our objective is to describe the cardiac manifestations found in an international cohort of 55 pediatric cases with multi‐system inflammatory syndrome (MIS‐C) during the SARS‐CoV2 pandemic.

METHODS. We reviewed data on previously healthy pediatric patients (≤18 years) with structurally normal hearts who presented at hospitals in the United States, United Kingdom, Spain and Pakistan with MIS‐C and had consultation with a pediatric cardiologist. Data collected included demographics, clinical presentation, laboratory values, electrocardiographic abnormalities, echocardiographic findings and initial therapies.

RESULTS. A total of 55 patients presented with MIS‐C. Thirty‐five patients (64%) had evidence of decreased left ventricular function, 17 (31%) had valvulitis, 12 (22%) with pericardial effusion and 11 (20%) with coronary abnormalities. Twenty‐seven (49%) required ICU admission and 24 (44%) had evidence of shock. Eleven patients (20%) fulfilled complete Kawasaki disease criteria and had lower NT pro‐BNP, D‐dimer and ferritin levels compared with those who did not fulfill criteria. Electrophysiologic abnormalities occurred in 6 patients and included complete atrioventricular (AV) block, transient AV block and ventricular tachycardia.

CONCLUSIONS. We describe the first international cohort of pediatric patients with MIS‐C during the SARS‐CoV2 pandemic with a range of cardiac manifestations. This paper brings awareness and alertness to the global medical community to recognize these children during the pandemic and understand the need for early cardiology evaluation and follow‐up.

SOURCE: JAHA

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Testing tracker

Testing trends tool

These charts lay out the key metrics for understanding the reach and severity of COVID-19 in a given area: number of new daily cases, tests per 100,000 people (testing rate), and percentage of tests that are positive (positivity rate).

As testing capacity increases, considering confirmed new cases, testing rates, and percent positivity together gives us a fuller picture of COVID-19 in a particular state or region. Under these conditions and stable testing practices, trends in daily cases can be cautiously interpreted as trends in transmission of the virus. Leaders can then make informed decisions about lifting social distancing and other transmission control measures.

JOHNS HOPKINS: Coronavirus Resource Center

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